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7 Wonders of the Modern World



We’re adding all of these to our bucket list! Which have you visited?

Also published on Medium.

Robert was born and raised in Nashville, TN, but had a thirst for seeing the world around him. He currently lives in New York City. His adventures have taken him to all corners of the world, but favorites include: attending the Rio Summer Olympics, island hopping in the Philippines, tasting every gelato flavor her could find in Rome, and surviving a Colombian death cab ride in Bogota. Robert is an out and proud gay man and hopes to inspire other members of the LGBTQ+ community to tell their stories, both of travel and personal. His debut book, I Know Where I’ve Been: A Year Long Journey of Self-Discovery, recounts his adventures traveling North and South America for a year while diving into his past growing up gay in the conservative South.


Your Toolbox for International Travel




How does being on a maintenance crew help you to travel?

To think that digging deeper into one stagnant place, sometimes literally to run electrical wiring or plant trees, would in turn help spread your wings. Yet, there are many things I learned as part of the maintenance crew at a camp facility. Paint will always make it’s way onto your clothing, coffee truly does boost morale, and leaf blowers are a source of power and unparalleled joy. Physical work is interestingly fulfilling, sometimes those who work the hardest earn the least, and time must be made for creation.

Perhaps the most important lesson I learned in these two weeks: Don’t forget your tools.

So naturally, that’s what I did. Amidst the chill of a November morning, my coffee still waking up in waves of steam, I dragged my legs across the gravel road. Back towards the shed, where the day started and where our future progress rested. When I secured my grasp on the small, silver chunks of the ratchet set, I felt as though I was bringing the team to victory. My muscles turned slowly, I checked the volume of my podcast, and made my way back down the road.

As I prepare to fly to South America on November 28th, I have searched the high and low depths of the internet for answers to so many questions. I failed in finding the shed of hope or a shiny, metallic cluster of utensils for assistance. So, I have compiled the various tools from my research into the following list. Consider this to be our traveling toolbox, one that we can grab from our pockets for an easy fix or how-to.

With my steadfast belief in the power of travel to aid in our understandings of ourselves and others, I hope this toolbox helps you feel better equipped to buy that ticket! 

Dolla-Dolla Bills

-Spread it like Skippy!

Avoid traveling with a lump sum of cash. Spread your money throughout your belongings and your clothing to help you adapt in emergency situations.

-Travelers Checks or Prepaid Credit

Avoid a cash shortage by using variations of payment, such as a Travelers Check or Credit Card. Although somewhat archaic, Travelers Checks can only be cashed by you, can help with budgeting, and don’t rely on an ATM. However, they do rely on your ability to find local banks and may still have currency exchange charges.

Through VISA, TravelEx, and Mastercard, you can purchase prepaid credit cards offered at a nearby Rite-Aid, Wal-mart, or CVS. These cards can be used at accepting locations, as well as upon your return to your homeland. Fidelity is a great option that offers cards without foreign-transaction fees or minimum balance limits.

-Call your Bank

Make sure to update your bank account with your travel plans. It is a real burden to be abroad with a frozen credit card, especially when the suspected fraud is simply you trying to buy a souvenir in Paris .

-Cover the Real Bills

Automate your payments and postpone incoming mail prior to your departure. Review your insurance plans and commit to a travel insurance payment if necessary.

-RFID Wallet

Made by Pacsafe and sold by REI Co-Op, this wallet prevents electronic-scanning theft, prevents cut-and-run theft, and can hold multiple passports and cash.

Security and Health

-Make Copies of your Passport and Health Forms

Carry replications of your passport with you and leave a few copies with an emergency contact. This should also be done for prescription and immunization forms, a great side-effect of a routine check-up at your primary care before leaving.

-Register with the Designated Embassy

This will simplify the process of contacting the government for any needs of safety or assistance. When doing so, you can check for entry/exit fees or necessary vaccinations.

-Create an Itinerary

Make an outline of your expected plans, especially your purpose of entry and departure information, and the conversation with immigration officials will flow more smoothly. This will encourage you to organize your own plans, print any maps, and leave behind an itinerary with an emergency contact.

-First-Aid and Health Supplies

With an immune system that weakens with a sneeze, I have learned to always carry a Med-Kit. This page from the CDC helps to narrow down what will be worth having on-reserve.

-Osprey Backpack

I will be carrying such medicine in this pack, the Ariel AGTM 75L, throughout my upcoming trip and beyond. With a simple rain cover, it does an exceptional job fitting all of my needs, blocks any roaming hands, and it sits comfortably on my hips!

Ayo Technology

-Cellular Plan

Contact your provider, find the most logical international plan at a reasonable cost, and make sure to activate the global settings on your phone. It is possible to forgo your home plan and take advantage of the cellular data of the country you’re visiting by transferring your SIM-card, which should hold your saved contacts and numbers, into a phone purchased abroad. 

-Portable Power Bank

POM Power2Go helps me to stay charged, yet there are many options that will allow you to charge your devices on-the-go. These mobile batteries vary in terms of how many charge cycles they provide, the average charge time, and the number of devices that can be charged simultaneously.

-Plug Adapter

It’s electric! Really though, make sure you check the common plug type and voltage of the country or countries you are visiting. This Kikkerland adapter seems to be popular, while this Skross adapter will assist with both plug and voltage adaptation.

Other Knowledge Nuggets

-Can I have your Card?

Use this business pick-up-line and place the card in your wallet to avoid losing track of your hostel or favorite restaurant.

-Prevent Hanger

Save yourself (and others) and bring snacks everywhere.

-Transportation Apps

By downloading international maps, you can follow along with public transportation to confirm that you are taking the best route. Don’t forget about the screenshot! This allows you to save your route as an image, which you can zoom into and expand without using any data.

-Avoid Public Nudity

Or don’t, if that is your thing. But do pack some clothing in your carry-on and explore options for how to check your bag.

-Hydrate or Die-drate

Not all places boast the advantages of filtered tap water or fountains, so you will need to set aside a balance for purchasing water bottles. If you’re expecting low water accessibility, consider this gear for filtering and disinfecting your H2O.

As an LGBTQ+ Traveler

Do your research! It is well-known that the LGBTQ+ community faces specific political, economic, and social challenges around the world.

For anyone planning to travel alone and/or as an open member or ally to the LGBTQ+ community, here are the resources that I have found to be most helpful: GlobalGayz, GayTravel, and PurpleRoofs.

While this list may aid in travel preparation, it is certainly not all-inclusive. Please share this article and tell us at TravelPride what additional tools help you to travel more proudly! Thanks for reading, and be on the look-out for my first post from Peru!

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GUEST POST: A week in Toronto with Kimberley SE




What to do, where to stay, what to wear and how to party!

Toronto is the laid back neighbor of New York that is still up and coming as one of the world’s must see cities. In late 2015 I spent a month exploring Toronto. 22, fresh out of university and armed with my camera, I traveled solo from the UK to explore Canada’s biggest city of entertainment and food.

What to do: If you’re in Toronto during the summer or fall, getting the ferry over to Toronto Island is a must. Great for casual strolls, long boarding and cycling, taking your kids to adventure and absolutely perfect for romantic first dates.

Woodbine Beach & Sugar Beach. To top up your tan and take a dip in Lake Ontario to cool off from the humidity during the summer.

Check out Kensington Market for trendy clothes and trinkets. The market is exceptionally arty and there’s tons of independent stores to explore.

Fancy incredibly picturesque Instagram style cocktails inspired by the world of Harry Potter? Who doesn’t. Head over to The Lockhart Cocktail Bar located on Dundas Street West where you’ll find a cosy Harry Potter styled bar that serves up explosive potions to quench your first (and your inner Harry potter fan girl screams).

Where to stay: Airbnb. Hands down. If you’re on any sort of budget definitely stay in an Airbnb in Toronto. While there’s some beautiful hotels (The Thompson Hotel for example) located in the city, you could get the local experience by staying in an Airbnb, and save a fortune while doing so. Airbnb is also welcoming as the hosts go the extra mile to make you feel safe and comfortable. There are great apartments available to suit your style of trip, whether you want to shop till you drop in the heart of Yonge and Dundas which is a mini Times Square, or chill by the beautiful harbor in Fort York (my home for a month, perfect for quiet down time but still close enough to the downtown core to easily get home after a long day of exploring) or hang out in the hippest parts of town: Parkdale, King Street West, Kensington Market and Bloor Street, there’s a neighbourhood to suit your exact style of trip and personality.

What to wear:

Summer & Spring: If you’re going any time between March and October, pack tshirts, shorts, light jumpers and an evening coat. A lot of people who haven’t been to Canada automatically assume it’s cold all year round. It’s not, it’s actually boiling during their summer in Toronto with temperatures reaching over 30 degrees (86F) daily.

Winter: Layers. Layers. Layers. More layers. A winter coat, adequate snow boots for those early morning adventures and did I say layers? Yep. Wrap up warm. As Toronto gets extremely hot in the summer it gets extremely cold in the winter. Make use of the thousands of cosy restaurants and cafes during their winter. For beer enthusiasts head over to Bar Volo for a range of Canadian Craft beer and Batch for European craft beer (if you want a taste of home like I did). And of course – grab a hot chocolate and some Tim Bits from Tim Hortons to officially feel Canadian.

Where to party: The LGBTQ night life scene in Toronto is huge, in fact – it’s the biggest in Canada. There is no shortage of options and events going on to meet new people from all over the world from all walks of life. The Village, located on the intersection between Church and Wellesley, is the home of Toronto’s LGBTQ scene. The area features restaurants, cafes and LGBTQ orientated stores. The Village is the place to be for exciting night spots and if you’re around in June, the Village holds the annual Gay Pride Parade and puts on hundreds of events to fill the streets with rainbow colors and glitter. Head to Crews and Tango’s for the best drag shows you’ll ever see or head over to Pegasus to play pool and video games to hang out and meet new people.

Through word of mouth I ended up at a night club party called Cream (now re-named to About Last Night), a once a month all girls LGBTQ party that welcomes hundreds of local gay women from all over the city. Great mixers, great music, great people. This is your go to place if you happen to be in the city wanting to meet girls and blow off some steam dancing. The best thing about Toronto is that nobody is shy – you’ll easily make new friends at huge events and there is always a party to be had in the Village.

If you haven’t already, download Her and keep an eye on their events page. In Toronto the Her team hold games nights, bar crawls and meet and greet events for gay women to make new friends and meet a potential match regularly. You’ll find it hard not to meet likeminded people and have fun.

The beauty of Toronto is that every day is different – and there’s something for everyone. It’s safe, it’s friendly and it’s very open minded to gay travellers.

Words by Kimberley SE

Kimberley is a British Australian magazine photographer currently based in the UK. Coming from a long line of globe trotters, she has a soft spot for small cities and can usually be found cruising along a beach on her skate board. We’re thrilled to have her guest posting on TravelPride!

Check out her blog here:

Also published on Medium.

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Ten Literary Landmarks For Any Traveling Booklover



Books are magical. They can take you to far-off places without even moving your feet. But what if you want to see the places of people you’ve read about in real life? Luckily, organizations such as the American Library Association, global historical society, and die-hard bookworms, have preserved and created literary landmarks that anyone can enjoy all across the world. From childhood homes, museums, and even statues. Here’s a list of 10 places to add to your literary bucket list.




Edith Wharton(1862-1937) broke gender boundaries and society’s exceptions to become one of America’s greatest writers. She was the first woman awarded the Pulitzer Prize for fiction for her novel Age of Innocence. Most of her novels have themes of declining morals and wealth in the late nineteenth century. The Mount is not your typical author home tour. Not only does it offer guided tours and exhibits, it also has ghost tours, mimosas on the terrace, a cafe, a women’s writer-in resistance program, and a pet cemetery. Heck, you can even have your wedding at the Mount, but honestly, you had me at ghost tours.

  1.  The windmill at the Stony Brook Southampton campus, Southampton, NY


 Okay, so I’m down for anything that has to deal with windmills but the story behind the Windmill at the Stony Brook Southampton Campus is both interesting and sad. In 1957. the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Tennessee Williams lived in the campus windmill after the death of his friend and Abstract Expressionist painter, Jackson Pollock, and wrote the play “The Day on Which a Man Dies” based on Pollock. Sad, but the fact that he lived in a windmill is pretty cool.

  1. Charles Dickens Museum, London , England

Making a trek to London during the holiday season?  Make sure you plan to visit 48 Doughty Street, the London Home of Charles Dickens. This is the home where the famed writer wrote the classic novel Oliver Twist and The Pickwick Papers. The Charles Dickens Museum holds over 100,000 items including manuscripts, personal items and more. There are exhibits, a garden cafe, as well as a lot of activities for children such as the Costumed Christmas walks, performances of “A Christmas Carol” and “A Very Dickensian Christmas Eve.”

  1. Sleepy Hollow, New York

Washington Irving’s The Legend of Sleepy Hollow has become a classic Halloween spooky story still read today. However, many don’t know that Sleepy Hollow is a real place, one which has fully embraced its celebrity status. There’s the Sleepy Hollow Cemetery Tour, The Great Jack O’Lantern Blaze, The Sleepy Hollow Lighthouse Tours, Haunted Hayrides and so much more. They even take on some other classic works such as a circus-theater adaptation of Edgar Allen Poe’s The Raven and a one-man show of A Christmas Carol.

  1. Walden Pond, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Get lost like Thoreau by visiting Walden Pond! Perfect for nature lovers, you can take a lovely nature walk/hike, spend the day at the beach, go kayaking or canoeing on the water or fish; you can even cross-country ski or snowshoe in the winter. You can visit Thoreau’s original cabin and the reproduction. Since the land has been left unchanged it’s almost like you’re walking through the Walden that Thoreau knew.

  1. Shakespeare’s Globe, London, England.

Shakespeare and book lovers go together like pretzels and Nutella. Even if you haven’t read any of the original Shakespearean text, you’ve probably been exposed to some adaptions (10 Things I Hate about You anyone?). The Globe is still standing after many rebuilds, and still holds performances as well as exhibitions and tours. They still put on Shakespeare’s plays; last season they put on King Lear, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night and Romeo and Juliet, some with a modern twist.

  1. Platform 9 ¾, King’s Cross Station, London

Every Harry Potter fan dreams of one day going to Platform 9 3/4 and getting on the Hogwarts Express. While you might not be able to hop on the Hogwarts Express, you can now find the actual Platform 9 3/4 and have your picture taken holding the handle of a trolley, making it look like you’re running from one world to the next. Don’t forget your wand and house scarf!

  1. James Joyce’s Dublin, Ireland.

Author James Joyce made his beloved Ireland famous with his epic novel Ulysses and other novels that also take place in the city of Dublin. It’s so popular that there is even a holiday known as “Bloomsday” in honor of the character. You can take a walking tour of James Joyce’s Dublin, a 3.5-mile route broken up into two days for the full experience. Some of the stops on the tour include the James Joyce Center, The Writer’s Museum, Merrion Square where you’ll find a statue of laid-back Oscar Wilde, and lots of bars.

  1. Jane Austen’s House and Museum, Hampshire, England

As a Jane Austen fan, I’m all about the Jane Austen House and Museum. Especially since this year is the 200th anniversary of Jane’s death. There’s a lot of bicentennial events going on including exhibits, film screenings, talks, walks, and even picnics. You may even find your match!

  1. Edgar Allan Poe Museum, Richmond, VA

As a huge Poe fan, I would be remiss to leave him off the list. The Poe house, while not in some haunted mansion or catacomb, is still pretty cool. They have an enchanted garden (with a Pumpkin Patch), a shrine to Poe where people like Gertrude Stein and H.P. Lovecraft have visited, as well as a large collection of Poe’s artifacts. The museum also has two living black cats: Edgar and Pluto, that live in the museum. There are also a lot of parties going on at the museum, such as a Halloween Bash, an “Unhappy” Hour of live music, and Poe’s Birthday Bash on January 20th. They host weddings at the Enchanted Garden, which is the only way I’ll ever have a wedding.


Have you visited these literary landmarks or have more destinations to add that will make any book lover put down their book? Let me know in the comments.

Happy Travels!

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