Connect with us

Travel

7 Wonders of the Modern World

Published

on

We’re adding all of these to our bucket list! Which have you visited?


Also published on Medium.

Robert was born and raised in Nashville, TN, but had a thirst for seeing the world around him. He currently lives in New York City. His adventures have taken him to all corners of the world, but favorites include: attending the Rio Summer Olympics, island hopping in the Philippines, tasting every gelato flavor her could find in Rome, and surviving a Colombian death cab ride in Bogota. Robert is an out and proud gay man and hopes to inspire other members of the LGBTQ+ community to tell their stories, both of travel and personal. His debut book, I Know Where I’ve Been: A Year Long Journey of Self-Discovery, recounts his adventures traveling North and South America for a year while diving into his past growing up gay in the conservative South.

Featured

Going Solo: The Benefits of Vacationing Alone

Published

on

We call friends on the phone, we go out to eat with friends and roommates and family, we make sure we always have company on road trips; rarely do we do anything truly alone anymore. Not that there is anything wrong with company. As social beings, humans are naturally drawn to others. But I feel as though we have lost track along the way of the benefits of being by ourselves, especially on trips. A vacation with loved ones is a wonderful experience, but think about what you can gain on a vacation with just yourself! If you can’t think of any, don’t worry, I’ve done it for you. So here are five tempting reasons to try a solo vacation at least once:

 

  • Paying for it is cheaper.

One plane ticket, one hotel room, one of everything. When you travel solo, you don’t have to worry about who will pay for dinner each night, or fight over who gets the room with the better view. Things seem to simplify when you vacation alone, and that’s exactly what you’ve always wanted out of a trip.

  • Planning becomes less complex.

In the same way, planning your vacation simplifies significantly. Think about it: Want to spend the whole day on the beach? Want to go hike the nearby mountain? Or try hang-gliding for the first time? Go do it. You won’t have to worry about your travel buddy saying “Eh, that doesn’t sound fun” or “why can’t we just sleep in all day?” When you’re on vacation, as nice as it is to sleep the day away, there are so many more interesting things you could be doing. So go do them, without having to sacrifice anything.

  • More time to reflect/unwind. 

Unless you’re in the habit of having entire conversations with yourself out loud, vacationing alone is probably quieter than it would be with another person. Because of this, you have more time to think and to be present in the moment. Experts are always talking about mindfulness, and a solo vacation is the perfect time to practice this. So while you’re reading or walking or sunbathing by yourself, take the opportunity to enjoy every moment to its fullest. Not only will you feel more rested when you get back to the daily grind, you’ll be able to come back knowing that you made the most of your time alone.  

  • A sense of true independence.

Without someone there to defer to on all of your decisions, you get to make every choice yourself, without the excuse of not wanting to ignore the wishes of your companion. You decide where you want to eat, where you want to stay, what you want to do each day. With this freedom comes a sense of independence and comes a sense of independence and self-reliance that you may not get by travelling with someone.

  • You’ll be alone, but not lonely.

And with your new sense of independence, you become more aware of the fact that while you may be alone, you don’t have to be lonely. Just because you don’t know anyone doesn’t mean there’s no one to talk to. Go to a bar and make friends, start a conversation with the person next to you on the plane, or at the next table over at dinner. Learn about a new place, or make a new friend from another city/state/country. Vacationing alone isn’t the same thing as isolating yourself.

Doesn’t that sound tempting? Sure, it might be difficult for some. But if you get the chance, try it. Bring a few books to read and enjoy that me-time better than ever before. I guarantee you won’t regret the chance to learn more about yourself.

Originally posted 2017-08-11 15:29:47.


Also published on Medium.

Continue Reading

Featured

Love It, Leave It: The Long Island (North Fork) Edition

Published

on

“I’m headed out east for the weekend!” — said every bougie New Yorker ever in summer. Most people take that phrase to mean the Hamptons, an iconic strip of the South Fork of Long Island, where celebs and Wall Street bros attend polo matches, sip on Dom Perignon and light piles of money on fire*. I, however, head to the North Fork, known for its up-and-coming wine region and small seaside towns with quaint restaurants and pebble beaches. Part of me hopes these towns will stay relatively uncrowded for a little while longer, but with NYC powerhouse chefs like Frank DeCarlo (of the famed Peasant restaurant) opening up shop in Greenport, my hopes may be dashed soon. Alas, the NoFo is the ideal weekend getaway for New Yorkers and you better get in there before it’s too cool.

Love It: Little Creek Oysters. Pellegrini Winery.

Little Creek Oysters (Greenport): HELLO, you adorable little oyster shack, you. Are you free Saturday night? What a coincidence, me too. This is the quintessential beach town seafood joint: outdoor space with unpretentious wooden benches, overlooking rows of boats (from modest fishing vessels to what I call the “P. Diddy yacht”). If you choose the “shuck yourself” option — like we intrepid lesbians — oyster prices are cut in half; pay only $18 per dozen vs. $3 per bivalve if the house shucks for you. The oysters are so local — literally from the Peconic Bay just a few miles away — and so incredibly fresh. Every beer on tap is even more local. Wait — is that even possible? Yep, you can practically see Greenport Brewing while you’re shucking.

Pellegrini Winery (Cutchogue): Many people still head out to the North Fork in massive party buses, consuming egregious amounts of booze en route to multiple wineries (where they’ll — you guessed it — continue drinking). A lot of wineries cater to this crowd, with food trucks, loud bands, and festivals. Then you have the Pellegrini-type wineries, that are passionate about the grapes, the process, and let the wine speak for itself. Aesthetically speaking, this vineyard is one you would want to get married at — simply put, it’s breathtaking. The wines were a perfect accompaniment to the exterior beauty of the vineyard. I was fond of the stainless steel Chardonnay and the Petit Verdot.

Leave It: Emilio’s (Greenport). Restaurants ‘out east’ can often be four-dollar-signs-on-Yelp expensive. This was mostly why Emilio’s came up on my family’s radar. We had hit up some pricey (but tasty) seafood spots and our wallets were starting to feel a bit vacant. This was a casual pizza joint on one side and a sit-down restaurant on the other. The menu wasn’t solely pizza (praise be because I simply cannot with subpar pizza); rather, it was accompanied with a list of staples like shrimp Francese and fettuccine alfredo. I went for the former and was wildly disappointed. The breading was essentially falling off of the shrimp and the iconic lemon butter sauce was uninspiring. Our table had also tried out the buffalo wings to start, which I endearingly dubbed “buffacue wings.” It was as if the kitchen ran out of its last bottle of Frank’s RedHot and dumped some barbecue sauce on top to even it out. To add insult to injury, the restaurant didn’t even have any music on, making you feel as if you were eating while the restaurant was mid-closing. Prices may be cheaper here, but this comes at a cost.

*This is an unverified statement, but not completely improbable.

Originally posted 2017-08-10 18:28:43.

Continue Reading

Featured

How to Work Whilst Travelling

Published

on

As a freelance writer, I am very privileged to call the world my office; just give me a Wi-Fi connection and a charging point and I am good to go.

Over the past eighteen months, I have worked on a train between Manchester and London , at an airport gate in DC while waiting for my flight, from the backseat of a car (connected to the Wi-Fi from a passing bus) and many, many, more places, but it hasn’t always been easy.

However, I have picked up some incredible tips for working whilst travelling and I’d like to share them with you. While these tips are gathered from my own experience about working while travelling, I’ve done my best to make the tips a little broader so that you can relate.

 

Planning

If you want to take your work on the road, you first need to consider the logistics of it; from whether you can do your job in another country to how much work you’ll need to do to keep afloat to what work you’ll actually do from abroad.

It’s important to figure this out before you go because otherwise, you will not be prepared to work abroad.

Can you work abroad?

Certain jobs allow you more flexibility to work abroad; if a have an office job and a lenient boss, start by asking to work from home a couple of days a week to build up some trust that you can still complete your workload outside of the office environment.

In other lines of work (manufacturing, retail) it’s harder, but not altogether impossible, to work abroad. If your company is multinational, there are sometimes temporary postings in other countries that you can take advantage of.

There is also the option of picking up temporary work as you travel (fruit picking, bartending) but in all honesty, that needs its own article.

How much work do you need to do?

Sorry everyone, here come that math portion of the article, where you have to work out how much money you actually need to earn. Total up how much the holiday is costing (accommodation, travel, entertainment) and figure out how much work you have to do to cover this.

As you’ll probably want to scale back on the amount of work you do, be prepared to accept a subsequent drop in pay (unless you get paid holiday leave that you can use to supplement your trip).

What work should you do?

It goes without saying that most people will skip out on in-person meetings while working from abroad, but will you still take video meetings or phone calls? It’s up to you, but remember to consider the time difference and potential call roaming costs before agreeing; no one wants to take a 3am phone call from their boss and come back to a huge bill.

There may also be some aspects of your job that cannot be done from abroad; like if you work in the IT department you can probably access your colleague’s computer remotely and remove the virus they downloaded but you can’t do anything about them spilling coffee all over the keyboard.

Execution

So you’ve gotten the boss’ approval, made all the relevant bookings, and even humblebragged on social media about your ultra cool digital nomad-esque trip, what’s next?

Packing

I’m sure that you don’t need to be told to pack your laptop and an adaptor for the area that you’re heading for, but have you considered what will happen if your laptop breaks while on holiday?

I take my tablet as a backup in case something goes wrong with my laptop, but also because it’s easier to use out of the hotel, like when I’m by the pool. Also, if you’ll be needed for any video calls, you might want to take a professional top; but you’ll probably get away with shorts on your lower half.

Communicate with your boss

Always try to be upfront about your situation and let people know asap if you’re going to have problems completing your work (this is just generally good advice). If the Wi-Fi is a little spotty or a storm has knocked the power out, it’s always worth sending the boss a text to let them know the problem and whether you’re going to need an extension.

Plan some actual time off

It may be a working vacation, but your work/life balance should ideally swing more toward life during this time.

When I went to Disney World on my USA trip last year, I knew that I wouldn’t have time to work- I mean, when I worked at Disney World I barely had time to work, but more on that in a different article- so I took that time as actual holiday.

Work during down time

Even on the best holidays, you’ll have some down time; like when your fellow traveller takes forever to get ready for dinner and you’ve been watching BBC News for 45 minutes. Use that time.

When I was in Boston, I would get up early and work for an hour before breakfast, while certain other people were hogging the bathroom, and when I was at Disney World, I would read my emails and come up with article ideas whilst in line for Space Mountain.

So there we have it, how to work abroad by someone who has actually done it. Has this inspired you to take a working holiday? Have you worked whilst travelling? What are some of your best tips? Let me know in the comments below.

Originally posted 2017-08-09 17:06:36.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement
Booking.com
Advertisement

Trending

Copyright © 2017 TravelPride | A Division of Brand Spankin' New Media