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The Best Drag Translated Into Convertible Fashion Looks

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Acid Betty at RuPaul's Dragcon 2017

One of the most exciting parts about planning a new adventure is, well, the planning portion of it.

According to a published 2010 study in Applied Research in Quality of Life, vacationers are happiest just before their vacation- especially the part that includes planning what outfits you’re going to slay the scene in. But how do the most fashionable among us combine being both the brave explorer and fulfilling the need to stay on point? Look no further than drag, hunty – it’s possible to put together outfits that will transform you from daring, daytime diva to nasty, nightlife naughty girl (or boy, or any other non-gender-conforming-general-badass). Read on to discover the best how-to-transform-your-lewk tips.

Club Kid

Let’s get the hardest one out of the way first (that’s what she said). The history of Club Kids began underground in the eighties and nineties, time periods during which drag and queer outcasts felt like they could finally be free to be themselves – and free to take all kinds of drugs. Michael Alig and James St. James were the New York City leaders of the Club Kid scene, as documented in the cult classic Party Monster and the book Disco Bloodbath: A Fabulous But True Tale of Murder in Clubland. The culture celebrated all things weird, outlandish, fabulous, bizarre – even downright disgusting. Some of the styles went mainstream, while some stayed firmly in the club scene.

Translating avant garde into regular ol’ garde can be tricky – especially when traveling. But it is doable. Keep your Club Kid wear to just one or two pieces that won’t get in the way of rock climbing at Jebel Rum or exploring Havasu Falls, like this body chain from Nasty Gal (body chain can also come in handy should your climbing rope break, and you need to Indiana Jones-it onto another rock, or signal to a passing helicopter that you’re about to plunge to your death.)

Another idea is to simply wear Club Kid-inspired makeup. Make sure you apply a lightweight, yet heavy-duty primer and base – tarte Amazonian Clay 12-Hour Full Coverage Foundation is a kickass base with a matte finish that contains SPF 15. This foundation can hold up through nearly anything, so do it up big when painting your face.

Goth

We all have a little goth in us, whether it’s the high school version of us that only shopped at Hot Topic, or the current, disenfranchised 30-year-old version of us with an all-black wardrobe and a glass-half-empty outlook (so, not much has changed). Unleash your inner goth queen while on vacay with that versatile, all-black wardrobe! Believe it or not, REI has some fab options, from Bill Adler belt to this La Selva rain jacket.The beauty of these pieces lies in their simplicity and ability to be just one part of your goth drag-inspired dark, twisted fantasy. Make sure to give yourself a smoky eye and some studded kicks for added badassery.

Pageant

Sometimes divas have to glam it up, whether we’re traveling alone or with our squirrel-friends. Pageant girls are the queens of all things fabulous, girly, big and beautiful – think the Kardashians, on beauty queen steroids. Just look at all these beautiful girls on Pinterest, living it up in places like London and possibly Italy in casualwear that may look basic, but that’s where you come in with your own fabulous, pageant girl take.

This look is all about big glam – and the bigger, the better. Try tassel and poof earrings, and big statement necklaces. Accessories are always a great option to glam up your travel look – trust, we’ve worn tassel earrings with trainers.

Androgyny

This style of drag is known as being “anti-queen,” as it doesn’t necessarily celebrate the femininity drag often strives to achieve – instead, it combines both masculine and feminine qualities, so that they somewhat cancel each other out, leading to an amorphous fashion statement. Queens that love this drag like to merge gender boundaries to create sexually ambiguous looks.

Possibly the simplest translation of drag look inspiration to travel in, the androgynous look is super versatile for nearly any climate or vacay from the ski slopes to the beach. Keep in mind that you can make even feminine-looking pieces androgynous by pairing them with more masculine looks. Be creative! Gender is a social construct, and who says you can’t wear a crocheted beach cover-up, even if you identify as a male, or shop in the “men’s” department if you’re super feminine? You do you. Live your best life, and whatever style of drag you choose to go on whatever adventure you want to go on – do it up big, because you are what? Sickening.

Originally posted 2017-09-11 21:47:06.

Anna Jones is a freelance writer, editor, and producer living in Atlanta, GA by way of Los Angeles. She owns a copywriting agency called Girl.Copy, and an independent film studio called Tiny Park Productions. She has been a professional writer for over 10 years, and four of those years were spent working for famous fashion bloggers and/or corporate fashion giants as a copywriter, like Hautelook and Nordstrom. She loves coffee, traveling, spending time with her family, and taking herself on solo sushi-and-beer dates.

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LGBTQ Fashion Revolutionaries: Steal Their Looks, Steal Their IDGAF Attitudes

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Hearing that a member of the fashion world is also a member of the LGBTQ+ community comes as no surprise – after all, the point of fashion is to bend the rules, be anything but normal, and to accept the extraordinary. It is fashion’s job to shake things up, so it’s no wonder that queer people are the movers and shakers at the helm of this industry.

We’re showcasing the best of the best in queer fashion – those who have broken the mold, stepped outside their comfort zones, and dominated the mainstream.

Alexander McQueen

Known as the “beloved bad boy of fashion,” Alexander McQueen was openly gay, extremely extra, and didn’t care to follow the rules – in fact, one might say he lived to break them. Coming from London ’s East End Givenchy house and moving on to his own label, McQueen was essentially the Mick Jagger of fashion. Known for shaking up the conservative label, McQueen sparked outrage when he moved to the French couture house, following John Galliano as Chief Designer. Once he had his own label, McQueen continued to push boundaries – even liberal ones. His shows were often controversial, and he was famous for creating “bumster” trousers, which essentially displayed a model’s butt cleavage, for lack of a better term. The bumsters were supposed to be a parody of construction workers, an interesting attitude toward class structure. McQueen often drew inspiration from tragedies, obscene events, and people who you would not see at any of his fashion shows.

One of the most memorable traits of McQueen was his I-don’t-give-a-f*ck attitude. Karl Lagerfeld of Chanel said of the late McQueen, “he was always interesting, never banal” – high compliments from another gay fashion rebel whose cat has its own Wikipedia page.

Andrej Pejić

An Australian trans model who has referred to herself as “living between genders,” Andreja Pejić is known as the “first completely androgynous trans model.” Starting her career as a male model photographed for Paris Vogue in womenswear, an idea brought forth by yet another fashion phenom, Carine Roitfeld, Pejić is not only taking the modeling world by storm, she’s also venturing into film and walking in the Prabal Gurung show at New York Fashion Week this year.

Pejić has noted that gender dysphoria is not easy to live with, and is an outspoken role model for trans youth around the world.

Tim Gunn

Honestly, do we even need to elaborate on Tim Gunn? Okay, we will, because he’s worth it – the Project Runway mentor is really everyone’s mentor, isn’t he? He’s like the impeccably dressed, kind-hearted, gay dad you never had but always knew you wanted.

Gunn had his beginnings, as many of us now know, as a high school teacher. He taught a design course at Corcoran School of Art in Washington D.C. and from there, went on to eventually teaching at Parsons and becoming an associate dean. Even before Gunn became a teacher, he had to overcome a debilitating stutter and admits that there were quite a few points in his life where he didn’t feel like he could “make it work” – but he did regardless. Gunn is a true inspiration.

Cara Delevingne

Cara Delevingne is one of the hottest models – and now-actresses – in Hollywood now. A stint as Enchantress in Suicide Squad and as Margo in Paper Towns has turned her into a bona fide movie star. Her career is on fire, but don’t ask her about her sexuality, unless you want to get a clap back. The blunt star has said, in regards to her bisexuality: “My sexuality is not a phase…I am who I am. I think that being in love with my girlfriend is a big part of why I’m feeling so happy with who I am these days.” We’re happy for her, and can’t wait to see what she does next.

Alexander Wang

Alexander Wang is an openly gay designer with a following- the likes of Rihanna, Chloe Sevigny, Azealia Banks, Gisele Bundchen, Nicki Minaj, and Lady Gaga, to name but a few. While recently making headlines as being oblivious to fans and viewers at his New York Fashion Week 2017 show, Wang is nonetheless an incredible fashion force to be reckoned with. The former Creative Director of Balenciaga, Wang has since gone on to start his own line and collaborate with H&M.

While some of the aforementioned icons are just beginning their careers, some are right in the middle, and some have tragically had their lives cut short, none seem to be without controversy (except for maybe our angel baby Tim Gunn). Whether good or bad, these revolutionaries have changed the fashion industry; time will tell what their ultimate thumbprint on the runway will be.

Originally posted 2017-09-18 16:54:51.

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The Death and Life of Marsha P Johnson Gives LGBTs’ a History They’ve Needed

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*To honor the gender fluidity of Marsha P Johnson, I will be referring to them as they.

 

We study our history, so we know from where we came. To learn about the American Revolution, we study the Founding Fathers, Susan B. Anthony for Woman’s Right, Martin Luther King Junior for the Civil Rights Movement. We are taught those histories. However yet the media and even history books have glossed over the gay rights movement, the one that is still being fought today. Who are our leaders? Where are their stories?

Thanks to director David Frances we have one, The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson a documentary released last month on Netflix. It tells the story of Marsha P. Johnson, their life as a transgender person, their activism in the LGBT community, and their mysterious death.

Even as a member of the LGBT community, until this documentary I was unaware of whom Marsha P. Johnson was, this Rosa Parks of the LGBT community. Therefore I was very much a blank slate about what this movie was going to be about. But nothing could prepare me for how emotional, impactful, and eye-opening this movie was going to be. This is a movie that blends both the past and the present, showing those in the community how far we’ve come, and how much work we still need to do.

The documentary uses a mix of never-before-seen footage, rediscovered interviews, and modern times, creating both a mystery that needs to be solved and a wake-up call.  This is especially seen in the opening of the film when we are shown a clip of people marching on the streets of New York , some waving rainbow flags, others holding signs, and others carrying a picture of a black, femme presenting woman, smiling. A Clark Kent type anchor man is heard in the voiceover, using the word “transvestite”, now an insensitive term, informing the viewer that it’s 1992 and Marsha P. Johnson is dead at 42 years old. Police say it’s a suicide.

But Johnson’s friends and members of the LGBT community believe that she was murdered.

This is not your typical documentary. Instead of a linear timeline or an autobiographical story of Johnson, we are given almost an LGBT detective story. An episode worthy of the show Cold Case, for sure. Our protagonist is Victoria Cruz, a transgender activist from the New York City Lesbian and Gay Anti-Violence Group and now amateur sleuth, about to retire, and her last case will be the 1992 murder of the beloved transgender icon.

While this is a movie about Johnson, we are given the personal backstory about not only Cruz and their personal history of assault, but other gay icons. For example, the movie goes into a side story about the LGBT activist Sylvia Rivera who co-founded STAR (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries) with Johnson which was a housing and support program for young trans women of color.

We are also introduced to so many other transgender community members that it almost became overwhelming. One of the drawbacks of this movie was that there wasn’t enough time for everything. The film is only an hour and 45 minutes long and it is so jam-packed with topics and issues and people that the viewer can be completely overwhelmed with both information and emotion. Personally, I feel that Sylvia Rivera could, and should, have their own documentary. Also, I would have been fine with the film being longer which is a rare critique, but with some much to cover, it needed time to slow down.

However, what it may lack in pacing is made up with impact. This film is a bucket of ice-cold water, waking up everyone in the LGBT community. Many people believe that the LGBT community has finally gained equality because they’ve won the right to get married. That’s it right? The war is over? But that is not the case for our trans members in our community who are still suffering today and often getting the brunt of anti-LGBT attacks.

Throughout the documentary we see trans women homeless, in prison, assaulted, and horribly murdered, with no one else to lean on but other LGBT community members who are also vulnerable. These trans women, many of them people of color, are ignored by society, even their fellow LGBT members. This is said best at the most powerful and poignant part of the movie. At the 2016 sentencing of a man who confessed to beating 21-year-old trans woman Islan Nettles to death in Harlem three years early. One activist standing outside of the courthouse goes on a rant about the “privileged gays” who once protested with the transgender people for equal rights and then promptly left them to fend for themselves once they won the right to gay marriage.

“It’s LGB T. It’s LGBT,” the activist cries. It’s painful because it’s true. Transgender and “drag queens” created the LGBT movement, they were the representation of the community. But who was there to represent them when they were being murdered and attacked? Who was there for Marsha P. Johnson?

Going back to the detective drama genre aspect, we go into theories to why Johnson was killed. There’s even with a theory that the mafia did it (Stonewall Inn being own by the Mafia at the time). Again, this movie has a lot of information, with not a lot of time, and at the end, we don’t get an answer. But what we do get are the stories told by POC Transgender woman and the smiling face of Marsha P. Johnson, and that is priceless.

The verdict

As someone who came into this movie not knowing a lot about LGBT history, I was blown away. I learned so much from this movie. It opened my eyes to a lot of subculture and caste systems of the LGBT community of which I wasn’t aware. I loved the old footage they had of Marsha P. Johnson in drag singing (poorly), Cruz in her younger, model days, and other older, historical clips. I felt really emotional watching Cruz getting hung up on over and over again. It affected me in a lot of ways, even if it was overwhelming and confusing at some points. I recommend it to anyone wanting to learn about LGBT history.

Rating: 4 out of 5 Queens.

“The Death and Lift of Marsha P. Johnson” can be watched on Netflix

Originally posted 2017-11-17 17:41:28.

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The Iconic Beverly Hills Hotel Wallpaper is Now on a Shoe, and We Are Unwell

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  1. Can someone please hop on healthcare.gov for us at 12AM on November 1, 2017, and get us signed up for the last bastion of hope for healthcare in America, BECAUSE WE ARE UNWELL.

Luxury brand Koio Collective attacked us this past month by partnering with The Beverly Hills Hotel to create a new sneaker with a pattern in the style of the hotel’s iconic wallpaper, and we. are. shook.

The rent check is about to be late for next month, because this shoe runs between $475 and $550. The sneaker is being sold exclusively online and at the hotel itself. Designed with the legendary Martinique Banana Leaf print, the history of the hotel – and the print itself – is one littered with celebrity, wealth, glamour, and sordidness, and we are here to read you the filth.

The hotel was built in Los Angeles in 1912 before Beverly Hills even existed. Of course, social media did not exist back then, but developer Burton Green, President of the Rodeo Land and Water Company, was a bit of a marketing genius; he wanted to incite a “land rush,” and advertised the hotel as located “halfway between Los Angeles and the sea.”

As Beverly Hills became its own city in 1914 due to its rapid growth, so the elite continued to flock to The Beverly Hills Hotel. From the 1940s on, it was a celebrity hotspot, attracting the likes of Princess Margaret (commoners were instructed to not speak to her unless spoken to, and to stay at least five feet away from her and Lord Snowdon at all times), the Crown Prince of Monaco, John Wayne, Henry Fonda, the Rat Pack, Marilyn Monroe, and Elizabeth Taylor; in fact, Elizabeth Taylor enjoyed quite a bit of time in the bungalows with six of her eight husbands, and Bungalow 7 is known as “Norma Jean,” because of the amount of time Monroe spent there. John Lennon and Yoko Ono spent a week in bed at the hotel. Lindsay Lohan’s list of the people who she allegedly slept with surfaced at the hotel. Several movies were, of course, filmed there, including: California Suite, American Gigolo, Shampoo, The Way We Were, and many more.

The hotel was – and still is – no stranger to what is dubbed in LA as “power lunches” (perhaps these days known as “power brunches”); in 1938, when Vivien Leigh went to the hotel to see lover Lawrence Olivier, he brought her to meet agent Myron Selznick. Not long after, she was cast to play Scarlett O’Hara in Gone With the Wind. Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy carried on much of their 25-year affair there. Howard Hughes had roast beef sandwiches delivered to a nook in a tree while he was living on the property – because what else are you going to do, as an eccentric millionaire, besides renting nine bungalows at The Beverly Hills Hotel and eat roast beef?

The history of the wallpaper is as rich as the tapestries it finds itself on. In 1937, decorator Dorothy Draper designed the banana leaf pattern, called “Brazilliance” for the California-based Arrowhead Springs Hotel. In 1942, Hollywood-based decorator Don Loper designs what became the iconic Martinique wallpaper, a banana leaf design based on the original that now adorns The Beverly Hills Hotel. Celebrities who stay in the hotel or go on photoshoots at the hotel are constantly photographed in front of it, cementing its place in history. The wallpaper can only be bought here. The good news is, small samples are available to the public at – gasp! – only $9.95, so you can have your own little piece of history.

As for the history of the shoe company, well, Koio is about 100 years younger than the hotel itself, yet Chris Wichert, one of the founding members of Koio, states that their company “shares [the]same values,” as the hotel, with a spokesperson for the hotel echoing the sentiment.

Edward Mady, Regional Director West Coast USA and General Manager at the hotel, states, “Koio is the ideal partner to create this fun footwear that celebrates the hotel’s most beloved design element and Southern California lifestyle.”

And showcasing SoCal it does – it makes us want to pack our bags and book a room now. Does In-N-Out do room service? Guess we’ll have to wait until we have the celebrity bankroll to truly have it all.

Originally posted 2017-10-22 16:45:51.

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