Connect with us

Featured

Mexico Travel Warning for US Travelers

Published

on

The U.S. State Department has issued a travel warning on Mexico, as well as popular tourist destination Cancun.  There was a previous travel warning on December 8, 2016, but unfortunately there is now a new warning which includes new criminal activities that jeopardize the safety of travelers.

Although resort areas and tourist destinations do not see high levels of drug-related crimes, areas along known major trafficking routes are dangerous.  Unfortunately, gun battles between criminal organizations and Mexican authorities have occurred, and U.S. citizens have been caught in the middle.  Some have been kidnapped, or been the victims of homicide, carjacking, and robbery – most frequently at night and on isolated roads.

To deal with this, the Mexican authorities have sent federal police and personnel to combat organized crime.  Travelers should be aware that criminals have built their own unauthorized checkpoints, while wearing police and military uniforms.  Since there has been reports of killed and abducted motorcyclists who have failed to stop at these checkpoints, the U.S. State Department advises that you should stop at all checkpoints.

If you are currently traveling in Mexico, and only just hearing about this warning, then here are some safety tips you could consider:

Scan Your Passport and Travel Document

If your passport or other travel documents are lost or stolen, then this is going to be a major problem. However, you could scan and send them to your e-mail, so that in the event that they do get lost or stolen, you will have them on file. Also consider e-mailing your travel itinerary to someone at home, so that he or she knows where you should be, and when you are expected to go back.

Be Discreet

If you walk around with a tour guidebook, and a camera around your neck, others will know you are a tourist. Blend in with the crowd, to lower your chances of being targeted.  Thieves may have very little interest in you, if it seems as if you know the area and have nothing valuable to offer (no expensive jewelry or watches). Furthermore, if you need money, then avoid using ATMs at night or in deserted places.  While you withdraw money, make sure you are not being watched closely (so that any thieves don’t look your way).

Don’t Call a Taxi On Your Own

Don’t call a taxi on your own, especially in Mexico City. If you need to go somewhere, then ask hotel staff to call a taxi, because they will note the driver’s name and the number of the taxi. Only use the authorized taxi service, which operates out of the airport and on bus stations.

The authorized taxi service, which runs in Mexico City and other tourist destinations, is designed to ensure your safety. When you purchase a ticket, the ticket should have a number on it.  While on the taxi, your driver can be tracked through the number on your ticket.

It’s quite easy to take an authorized taxi. If there is the sign “Taxis Autorisados” or “Transporte Terrestre” then you have found the right place for an authorized taxi. Purchase your ticket, and tell the ticket agent your destination and wait for a staff member, to take you to your taxi.

Write Down All Your Card Numbers and Customer Service Numbers

Write down all your credit card numbers, and relevant customer service phone numbers, so that if you lose any of your credit cards (or if they get stolen), then you can report it immediately. Another tip is to call your credit card companies to let them know you will be traveling, and ask them to contact you if there are any transactions that look suspicious.

Be Alert

Be alert and safe. Don’t walk around looking at your smartphone – keep it in a safe place, like your pocket or a safe and discreet place in your purse or bag.

 

Originally posted 2017-09-14 14:32:47.

Hello, my name is Shipra and I am a writer who likes to explore travel, social justice and other issues. After college I began my journey is Australia where I worked for campaigns and sales, and then went on to travel in other places. Currently I live in New Jersey with my two dogs, Guster and Tip.

Featured

Getting Lost the Right Way (and Avoiding the Wrong)

Published

on

Road trips are magical. The open road, the endless possibilities. But you know what isn’t so magical? Getting lost in the middle of nowhere (read: out in the boondocks where not even the coyotes know where the closest gas station is). That being said, there is a right way and a very, very wrong way to get lost on a trip.

If you want to get lost and enjoy yourself, it’s best to have a plan in place. Seems counterintuitive, yes. But getting lost on purpose is more organized than it sounds. To start, know the highways nearby and keep in mind that the point of getting lost on purpose is to see new things. When lost the right way, it’s certainly not about the destination, which is good to keep in mind. For one, make sure your tank is completely full. Nothing is scarier than getting lost in the countryside with only a quarter tank and no sign of civilization in sight.

Don’t trust that GPS will always be there for you. Like that one friend, it probably won’t be (Totally not something that happened to me recently in rural south Georgia, not at all). Depending on your carrier, data connection and location services can be spotty at best and nonexistent at worst. Don’t be like me, who learned this the hard way.

Use GPS even if you think you remember the way back. The last drive I went on, I followed directions very carefully getting there and believed that I would be able to remember the turns in reverse going home.This resulted in what I like to call: a disaster. What I didn’t consider was the fact that rural Georgia looks completely different at night, when every tree looks the same and you have the added hazard of deer all over the roads. I knew I was lost after twenty minutes, but I kept driving, foolishly positive I’d eventually find the right road again.

Maps are your friends. Remember how your parents always told you to keep a map or atlas in your glove box? They weren’t just being old-fashioned. When GPS has failed and you longer recognize any landmarks, a map is your only hope (barring meeting a friendly stranger or an extra cell tower magically constructing itself in the next open field).

Print out directions beforehand. I know, I know. Printing out directions Google Maps is almost as dated as paper maps. But believe me, it can’t hurt. Even if you don’t print them, the screenshot feature on smart phones exists for a reason. Before you hit the road, coffee and snacks stocked and ready to go, pull up GPS while you have bars or Wi-Fi, and find the turn-by-turn directions. Screenshot them. And then, when you inevitably lose service at some point in your voyage, you still have access to your route. I didn’t do this, and by the time I had service again, I was two and a half hours away from home, when the drive should’ve taken an hour. (Do as I say, not as I do, my friends).

If you realize you’re lost and know where you took the wrong turn, GO BACK ASAP.

There comes a moment when you’re lost when you can usually pinpoint where you went wrong. When that happens, turn around as soon as you realize, despite the hope that maybe you’ll find a familiar street. Realizing you took a wrong turn is a sign from the universe that you need to go back, rather than trusting your foolish instincts. It’s a losing battle, and you will get more lost. It’s practically the law of the universe.

Just ask for directions, no matter how much you hate doing it.

This applies to everyone, and I’m ignoring the stereotype because it really isn’t just men. If you see a gas station or a small business, just stop. It’s almost guaranteed that someone will know how to get back to where you were headed, and you might stumble upon a cool store or attraction or monument that you wouldn’t have seen otherwise.

The moral of the story, friends, is that getting lost can be an adventure. You learn things about the area, about yourself as a navigator (this could be good or bad) and best of all, you have a story to tell at the end of it. Just remember that if you’re gonna get lost, try to do it on purpose.

 

Originally posted 2017-08-24 17:57:03.


Also published on Medium.

Continue Reading

Featured

Metalhead Transgender Woman is Making Political History

Published

on

As a long-time fan of metal music and an advocate for LGBTQ+ rights, I am ecstatic that Danica Roem, band member of her band Cab Ride Home and transgender woman won a four-way Democratic primary on June 13th. In addition to being a musician in a metal band, she was also an experienced journalist in Prince William County, which is the county she wishes to represent if she wins the position a seat in the House of Delegates in Virginia.

However, while Roem has won the battle, she’s still fighting a war. In order to gain a seat in the House of Delegates, she will have to defeat Republican Bob Marshall who is currently serving his eleventh term. Bob Marshall supports one-man, one-woman marriage, believes that same-sex marriage has a negative effect on heterosexual marriage, introduced the Physical Privacy Act which would have prevented transgender individuals from using the bathroom that corresponds with their gender identity (luckily this bill failed), supports the idea that employers can fire someone based on sexual orientation and gender identity, has a weak idea of what equality means and twists around words to fit his agenda,

“There never were ‘heterosexual’ only water fountains in Virginia or other Southern states.  Separate elementary or secondary schools were not built for GLBTQ children.  Homosexuals and lesbians could sit anywhere they wanted on buses, trains and other public transportation.  Homosexuals were never enslaved as a class or brought to America in chains.  Homosexuals never were forbidden from ‘marrying’ heterosexuals.  Homosexuals did not have to engage in nationwide ‘sit ins’ at restaurant lunch counters to be served a meal.  Lesbians did not have to take “Literacy” tests as a condition for voting.” 

and many more discriminatory ideas. In comparison, Roem supports adding sexual orientation and gender identity to the Prince William School system’s nondiscrimination policy, protecting transgender students, and values people individually, not by what religion they belong to or what sexual orientation they may have.

With the current presidency comes a resurgence of ultra-conservative ideas and, because of that, it is a possibility that Bob Marshall will serve a twelfth term. However, Roem is off to a good start. By winning the Democratic primary, she is showing the US that even the most conservatives of states can switch courses and realize that members of the LGBT community deserve the same rights and opportunities as everyone else.

Since 1991, when Marshall was elected, Prince William County has become more left-leaning as the population grows. It was one of the Republican-controlled counties that voted for Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump which shows that the district leans more toward to progressive side, which is definitely good news for Danica Roem. Because of this, Roem has a real chance of winning a seat in the House of Delegates. Even if she does not earn the position, by running and winning the Democratic primary, Roem set the stage for future transgender individuals to run for a position in the government.

Originally posted 2017-08-24 11:48:44.


Also published on Medium.

Continue Reading

Featured

The Do’s & Don’ts of Meeting Non-binary People

Published

on

Wikipedia defines non-binary as: “Genderqueer (GQ), also termed non-binary (NB), is a catch-all category for gender identities that are not exclusively masculine or feminine‍…”

More and more people are identifying as non-binary and accepting this term as a gender identity. Because of this, people are becoming more aware of its existence, and might not know how to respond to it.

I’m no expert, but I do have a little advice if you’re wondering how to interact with non-binary/genderqueer individuals.

Do: Ask for pronouns.

While not all non-binary people use different pronouns, many do, and a good rule of thumb is “if you’re not sure, ask.” Chances are the person will gladly tell you what pronouns they prefer. It also helps when you introduce yourself to a new person to say “my name is ____ and I prefer she/her or he/him pronouns, etc.” to let people know from the start that you’re open to discussing pronouns.

Don’t: Assume pronouns.

We all know the adage about what happens when you assume. While it might go well, it’s never okay to make assumptions about people before speaking to them. So again, if you don’t know, ask. The worst that can happen is they give you a funny look when you ask them for pronouns. Also, remember that not every non-binary person uses they/them pronouns. There are a number of variations, which is why it’s important to ask what pronouns someone prefers.

Do: Educate yourself.

If you’ve never met a non-binary person before, do a little research to familiarize yourself with what it means and what you should do with that information. Asking people who identify as non-binary is okay, but keep in mind that it’s not their job to educate you.

Don’t: Rely solely on a nonbinary person to educate you.

As mentioned above, it’s ultimately up to you to familiarize yourself with unfamiliar concepts surrounding gender identity. Just because your non-binary friend knows a lot, doesn’t mean they want to be constantly questioned. They are just people, not all-knowing gurus on the nuances of gender.

Do: Apologize if you get pronouns wrong.

Mistakes happen. One of my best friends identifies as non-binary, and I do my best to use their preferred pronouns, but I still slip up from time to time, and it’s not the end of the world. If you catch yourself slipping, correct yourself as soon as you realize, and try to do better next time.

Don’t: Make a huge scene about the mistake.

The last thing people want is someone drawing unnecessary attention to your slip-up. If you misgender someone, correct it, but don’t start apologizing profusely mid-conversation. If needed, pull the person aside later and apologize, explaining the mistake. Chances are that they noticed the mistake but most people won’t take it personally if you take responsibility for it.

Do: Respect a person’s identity.

Just like some believe that being straight is the only “normal” orientation, there are many who believe there are only two genders. But in reality, gender is fluid, and identifying as non-binary is just as valid as identifying as male or female. People deserve respect, no matter how they identify, and it’s not up to you to judge or spread hatred to others.

Don’t: Assume that nonbinary = transgender (or vice versa).

Often, being non-binary means identifying as neither male/female, or identifying as both. Just like with transgender individuals, you should never ask inappropriate questions about genitals or whether someone has had “the operation.” That’s personal and is up to the individual whether they wish to share that information with close friends/loved ones. Not with random strangers they just met.

Everyone deserves the same respect, no matter their sex, gender, or sexual orientation. Everyone is doing their best to live happy lives, and it’s not our business to judge others. TravelPride is all about acceptance and exploration, and I hope that these values can be shared by everyone who reads these articles. It’s a big world, filled with unique people. The least we can do is spread the love.

Originally posted 2017-08-23 17:04:27.


Also published on Medium.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement
Booking.com
Advertisement

Trending

Copyright © 2017 TravelPride | A Division of Brand Spankin' New Media